Contraceptive pills and pregnancy lower uterine cancer risk – study

Researchers at the University of Melbourne found that women with Lynch syndrome have a lower risk of uterine cancer if they are taking hormonal contraceptives or have been pregnant before, Health Canal reported on July 7.

The study, which involved 1,128 women with a gene mutation that causes Lynch syndrome, found that women who had one child were 60% less likely to have uterine cancer compared to those who had none. The risk became even lower for women with more than one child. On the other hand, women who took hormonal contraceptives for at least a year decreased their risk of uterine cancer by 50%.

Lynch syndrome is a genetic disease that increases a woman’s risk of certain types of cancer, including uterine cancer. One in 1,000 women has a Lynch syndrome-causing gene mutation.

Apart from Lynch syndrome, the use of a power morcellator during hysterectomies also increases a woman’s risk of uterine cancer. Speak with an attorney at Williams Kherkher by calling (800) 220-9341 to learn more about how to hold the maker of this dangerous medical device accountable for the harm it has caused you.

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